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If You Suffer from Anxiety or Depression, You May Have a Higher Risk for Stroke

A new study from researchers at the University of Edinburgh has shown that adults who suffer from mood disorders may have a higher risk for stroke or heart attack. The long-term study, published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality Outcomes, followed nearly 222,000 people older than 45 for almost 5 years. None of the participants had a stroke or heart attack in their medical history. Among men age 45-79, those who had experienced a moderate amount of psychological distress before the study began were 20% likelier to have a stroke and 28% likelier to suffer a heart attack, as compared to men without mental disorders. Men who suffered psychological problems at high levels were 44% likelier to suffer a stroke and 60% likelier to suffer a heart attack. The rate of stroke and heart attack for women was slightly different. Among the same age group, women who had suffered moderate psychological distress were 28% likelier to suffer a stroke and 12% likelier to suffer a heart attack. Meanwhile, women with very high levels of psychological issues were 68% likelier to suffer a stroke and 24% likelier to suffer a heart attack. Researchers note that the study wasn’t meant to definitively prove a connection between mood disorders and heart attacks/strokes. However, they say it's possible that mood disorder symptoms can affect the body negatively, such as increasing inflammation in the circulatory system, though more studies are needed.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, online August 28, 2018.